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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 January 25, 1937 No. 



LATE CABLES... 

Canada final estimates of 1936 crops reported as follows, 
with 1935 comparisons in parentheses: Wheat 229,218,000 bushels 
(281,935,000), rye 4,281,000 (9,606,000), barley 71,922,000 
(83,975,000), oats 288,764,000 (418,995,000), flaxseed 1,795,000 
(1,472,000), and potatoes 65,057,000 bushels (64,450,000). 
(Telegram, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, January 21, 
1937 . ) 

Argentina threshing of wheat and flaxseed in full swing. 
Wheat harvest results satisfactory and grain quite heavy, but 
flaxseed harvest only fairly satisfactory. Shelling of 1935-36 
corn practically completed . The soil was in good condition for 
late sowings of the 1936-37 crop, and crop condition considered 
good. (International Institute of Agriculture, Rome, January 20, 
1937. ) 

Greece acreages sown for 1937 crop estimated as follows, 
with 1936 comparisons in parentheses: Wheat 2,076,000 acres 
(2,011,000) , rye 160,000 (203,000) , barley 509,000 acres (529,000) . 
(International Institute of Agriculture, Rome, January 20, 1937.) 

Algeria final 1936 wheat and barley production estimates 
placed at 29,762,000 and 29,487,000 bushels, respectively, as 
compared with 33,533,000 and 33,019,000 bushels reported for 
1936. Weather during past month favorable for winter cereals; 
area sown expected to exceed that of previous season; growth of 
new plants excellent. (International Institute of Agriculture, 
Rome, January 18, 1937.) 

British Board of Trade announces provisional continuation 
of present bacon import quota rates until March 31, 1937. This 
would allow imports of about 148,000,000 pounds between January 
1 and March 31, an increase of 4 percent over the original quota 
announced for January-March 1935, but only 2.4 percent above the 
revised quotas for this period. (Agricultural Attache C. C. 
Taylor, London, January 20, 1937.) 



48 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, Ho. 4 



BREAD GRAINS 

Crop conditions in the Southern Hemisphere 

The harvesting of the 1936-37 A rgentin e wheat crop progressed 
favorably during the month of December, according to a report from the 
Ministry of Agriculture. With a few exceptions, the results obtained in 
the Province of Buenos Aires were considered satisfactory, largely be- 
cause of timely rainfall late in November. Good yields were fairly gen- 
eral in the Province of Cordoba. Rains in the Province of Santa Fe in- 
terfered somewhat with harvesting operations, but most of the fields 
still standing appeared uniform and generally healthy. Rains in the 
Province of Entre Rios were beneficial, and in the Territory of La Pampa 
some improvement was noted, but yields were somewhat below normal, poor 
yields were reported for both of the less important Provinces of Santiago 
del Estero and San Luis. 

Harvesting of the Australian crop was completed in Western 
Australia by January 16, according to a cable from the International In- 
stitute of Agriculture at Rome, but yields were quite poor. Harvesting 
was delayed in South Australia, Victoria, and a part of New South Wales 
by too much rain. Some damage to the crop was reported in South Australia, 
but yields in New South Wales, which accounts for almost a third of the 
total Australian crop, were expected to be about average as were those of 
last season. Good returns were reported in Victoria. The preliminary es- 
timate for all Australia issued in November indicated a crop about 6 per- 
cent under that of 1935-35. 

Shangh ai wheat market 

Wheat and flour prices declined on the Shanghai market during the 
period January 1-15, as a result of larger arrivals of domestic wheat and 
the continuation of poor demand for flour, according to a radiogram from 
the Shanghai office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Although 
influenced by lower tendencies on world markets, the decrease in domestic 
quotations exceeded world declines, especially for flour. No interest 
has been shown recently in foreign wheat . It now appears possible that 
Chinese wheat requirements may be met by old-crop domestic grain until the 
new crop is available. Flour consumption has been reduced during the past 
few months because of the high prices prevailing and the abundant supplies 
of rice and other foods which are available at prices below their usual 
parity with flour. Shanghai mills have continued to operate at 50-percent 
capacity, and stocks of flour increased to about 1,100,000 bags. Wheat 
stocks were estimated at about 4,000,000 bushels. 

The nominal price of Australian wheat at Shanghai during the week 
ended January 15 was quoted at $1.30 per bushel; best-quality spot domes- 
tic at $1,05. Futures on January 15 varied from $1.05 per bushel for 



January 25, 1937 Foreign Crops and Markets 



49 



January delivery to $1.09 for March and April, and 89 cents per "bushel for 
new wheat, June delivery. Spot flour was $1.20 per lag of 49 pounds, and 
futures ranged from $1.20 per "bag delivered in January to $1.23 for de- 
livery in April. Australian flour, c.i.f. Hong Kong, was $5.10 per bar- 
rel of 196 pounds. 

No purchases of foreign wheat were reported at Tientsin during 
November and December, and flour arrivals in December were considerably 
below those of preceding months. 

FEED GRAINS 

Argentine corn crop in exce llent c ondition 

Crop conditions in the Argentine corn zone indicate excellent 
prospects for the 1936-37 crop, according to information received from 
Agricultural Attache p. 0. Nyhus at Buenos Aires. Planting was as much 
as 2 weeks to 1 month late, but this was offset by rapid growth, and no 
apparent setback was experienced. Frequent rains in December resulted 
in moisture conditions that could hardly have been more favorable. For 
the main corn zone, the December rainfall was the highest recorded in 32 
years. TJhile some damage from excessive moisture was feared, none of 
consequence was reported. Average yields seem assured, and given occa- 
sional showers in January excellent yields may be obtained. 

COTTON 

Chinese cotton arrivals at Shanghai large 



Preliminary arrivals of Chinese raw cotton at Shanghai for the pe- 
riod of October-December 1936 were 625,531 bales of 500 pounds as compared 
with 357,399 bales during the same months in 1935, as reported by Agri- 
cultural Commissioner Owen L. Dawson at Shanghai. Preliminary, arrivals 
in December exceeded those of November, resulting in a significant in- 
crease in stocks. Arrivals during December amounted to 236,940 bales, 
made up of 228,967 Chinese, 1,950 American, and 6,023 bales from other 
countries . 

Chinese imports of raw cotton during the present season have been 
larger than those of the corresponding period a year ago, but imports of 
American have decreased considerably. During October and November 1936, 
China imported a total of 14,441 bales as against 8,040 bales in October- 
November 1935. Imports of American cotton for the 2 months this season 
amounted to 783 bales as compared with 3,261 for the same period in 1935. 
There have been no significant purchases of American or Indian cotton 
since the beginning of this season; however, about 20,000 bales were 
purchased from Brazil. 

Spinning mill requirements of foreign cotton for China and Manchuria 
for the year ending September 30, 1937, are estimated by Mr. Dawson at 
200,000 bales of 500 pounds, as compared with consumption of 296,000 bales 



50 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 4 



for the crop year October 1935 - September 1936. Requirements for the 
1936-37 crop year are expected to consist of 50,000 bales from the United 
States, 90,000 from India, and 60,000 from other cotton-producing countries. 

Both current and forward prices of domestic cotton have remained 
practically unchanged, prices of American and Indian have advanced 
slightly during the month. Yarn prices registered the largest gain in 
comparison with the preceding month. The price parity of yarn and cotton . 
remains unusually favorable for the spinning industry. The demand for 
yarn during December was very active. Cotton mill activity in China con- 
tinued at a high level. 

CHINA: Imports of raw cotton in November 1936, with comparisons 



(in bales of 500 p ounds) 

Growth ' November j October - November 

J 1955 ' ; 1936 j . 19 55 [ ~~~ 1956 

: Bale s ; Bales • : Bales ; Bales 

American j 1,055 • 783 : 5,261 j 733 

Indian j 1,062 » 347 : 2,591 \ 1,514 

Egyptian j 1,051 j 2,126 j 2,195 '■ 2,820 

Others .; 96 : 3 ,136 : 197-. : 9,524 

Total : 3, 244 j 6.394 : 6.0 42 ' 14.441 



CHINA: Stocks in Shanghai public warehouses, December 31,. 1936, 

with comparisons 

(In bales of 500 pounds) 



C-rowth 


1935 


1936 


December 31 


November 


30 


December 31 




Bales 


Bales 




Bales 


American 


12,000 






1,000 


Indian 


1,000 






aj 


Chinese 


113,000 


117,000 




144,000 


Egyptian 

Othqr 


1,000 


2 . 000 




1,000 
1.000 


Total • 


127,000 


119,000 


147 , 000 



a/ Negligible. 



CHINA: Price per pound of specified grades of cotton and yarn at 
Shanghai, January 12, 1937, with comparisons 



Growth 


Date of delivery 


December 11, 
1956 


January 15, 
1957 






Cents 


Cents 


Domestic cotton .... 


Current month 


11.55 


11.54 


Domestic cotton .... 


2 months forward 


11.79 


. 11.75 


American Middling 


Immediate shipment 


16.54 


16.73 




I nime di ate shipment 
2 months forward 


12.28 


12.58 




16.77 


17.59 





January 25, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



51 



FRUITS, VJ&JffiABLSS, AND NUTS 

Stocks of apples in England 

Apples in cold (gas) storage in England on January 1 were re- 
ported "by Agricultural Commissioner F, A. Motz at London as follows: 
Cooking apples 1,500,000 bushels, of which 93 percent were Braraley 1 s 
Seedlings; dessert apples 70,000 oushels, of which 80 percent were Cox's 
Orange pippin. Apples in common storage are showing considerable shriv- 
eling and- are not holding up. Stocks of French apples are estimated at 
around 1,150,000 "bushels, most of which are of very poor quality. Stocks 
of Dutch and Belgian apples are diminishing rapidly. 

Citron harvest in Sicily small 

The citron crop in the Messina section of Sicily was about 4,500 
short tons this year compared with a normal yield of about 6,000 tons, 
according to a communication from ¥. Sverett Scotten, American Vice Con- 
sul at Palermo, Italy. ADout one-fourth of the crop was brined for ex- 
port and the balance went to Leghorn for the candying trade. Although 
only 20 or 25 percent of the Italian citron crop is produced in the 
Messina', section of Sicily, the proportion brined for export accounts for 
more tnan half of the Italia.n exports of brined citron* 

Europe an citrus do mina te s British market 

Unsettled conditions in Spain have not improved the British market 
for American oranges, Agricultural Commissioner F. A. Motz at London re- 
ports. Arrivals of Spanish oranges continue relatively large. Jaffa 
oranges also are plentiful, but the quality this season is considerably 
lower than usual. Jaffa grapefruit also has been plentiful, but the 
inferior quality has contributed to the reduced demand for grapefruit 
from any source. By early January the quality of shipments had im- 
proved somewhat, but buyers were showing little interest. Tangerines 
from the United States, which enjoyed an unusually good Christmas trade 
as a result of Spanish uncertainties, have met with a diminished post- 
holiday tra.de at materially lower prices. Lemons continue to find a. good 
market, with Italian supplies reduced by the short Sicilian crop. 

Oranges 

The unexpectedly maintained volume of Spanish shipments of oranges 

in December prevented any additional business in American oranges, and 
similar conditions are seen for January and perhaps February. Uncertainty 
with respect to how Spanish transactions should be handled hampered the 
business somewhat, but suspension on December 19 of the terms of the 
Anglo-Spanish payments agreement facilitated direct trade negotiations 
and payments. In the last half of December, shipments were considerably 
heavier than in the corresponding 1935 period. The post-holiday period 



52 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, Ho. 4 



has been marked "by a free movement of Spanish, oranges into consumption. 
Interest in Jaffa oranges has been only moderate, largely because of lack 
of color. The Jaffa crop has suffered materially from storms this season 
and good-quality fruit has been relatively scarce. The British trade, 
however, sees no real shortage of oranges from usual sources this season. 

'3- rape fruit 

Prior to the arrival of the low-quality Jaffa grapefruit, that fruit 
experienced an active period in the British market. Throughout December the 
Jaffa fruit predominated in the market. The quality has improved in recent 
weeks, but the trade has shown little revival of interest in grapefruit from 
any source. Current consumption, however, continues at levels about twice as 
high as those of 5 or 6 years ago. Mr. Motz sees some likelihood of greater 
interest in American grapefruit later this season, particularly since storm 
damage to Jaffa groves has definitely reduced export supplies. He suggests, 
however, that the prospect for the immediate future does not favor shipments 
from the United States in any considerable volume. 



WHEAT, IUCLUDIITG ELOUS: Shipments from principal exporting countries as 
given by current trade sources, 1934-35 to 1936-37 





; Total : 


Shipments 


1936 


Shipments 


Country 


shipments 




week ended 


July 1 


- Jan. 16 




1934-35 11935-36 : 


J an. 2 


Jan. 9 


Jan. 16 


1935-36 


1935-37 




: 1,000 ; l.ooo : 


1,000 


1,000 ■ 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




bushels bushels -bushels 


bushels 1 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


North America a/.. 


1 162 , 832; 219,683 


3,976 


3,051 


2,827 


102,440 


152,856 


Canada, 














4 markets b/ . . . . 


• 176,059; 246,193 


1,588 


. 1,133 j 


1,398 


169,489 


157,293 


United States c/.. 


• 21,532: 15,930 


160 


■ 108 


70 


4,183 


5,33c 




• 186, 22&; 77,384; 


4,103 


3,926 


5,711 


53, 189 


44,362 




; 111, 628: 110,060; 


1,844 


• 1,990 ; 


1,712 


50,361 


40,022 




: 1,672- 30,224j 


0 


; 0 : 


0 


25,504 


88 


Danube & Bulgaria dy 


; : 4,104: 8,213 


944 


928 


1,400 


7, 512 


43,416 




c/ 2,3l8fc/ 2,529! 


0 


! 112 


0 


256 


7,064 


Total e/ 


! 468.782: 448, 10 1? 








239,262 


233,288 


Total European 










tJ 


f/ 


shipments a/. . . . 


; 387,752; 355,032 


9,576 






175,392 


211,756 


Total ex-European 










jr 


£/ 


shipments aj . . . . 


j 147,938| 133,528'' 


1,784 






66,664 


' 69,632 



Compiled from official and trade sources. a/ Broomhall's Corn Trade Hews, 
b/ Eort William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Hew Westminster, 
c/ Official. Accumulations represent data for 16 ports only and are not 
complete data for the United States. d/ Black Sea shipments only. ej Total 
of trade figures includes Horth America as reported by Broomhall. f/ To 
January 2. 



January 25, 1937 Foreign Crops and Markets 

WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of May futures 



53 



Date 



High c/. 
Low c/ . . 
Dec. 26. 

Jan. 2.. 
9. . 
16. . 

a/ Conve 
other pr 
futures . 



Chicago 


Kansas City 


Minneapolis 


Winnipeg a/ 


Liverpool a/ 


Bueno s 
Aires b/ 


1935 1936 


' 1935 


1936 


1935 1936 


1935 


1936 


1935. 1936 


1935 1936 


Cents Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 
~ 130 
108 
130 


Cent s 
122 
104 
103 


Cents 


Cen t s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents- 


Cents 


106 
94 
99 


136 
112 
136 


108 

94 
99 


144 
120 
144 


99 
86 
87 


129 
106 
129 


96 
81 
92 


133 
110 
129 


d/ 94' 
d/ 68 
e/ 92 


d/101 

a/ 9i 

e/ 99 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 
89 
88 
89 


1937 
129 
129 
125 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


102 
101 
101 


135 
134 
133 


102 
100 
100 


13(T 

128 

126 


111 
108 
110 


144 
142 
140 


95 

95 
96 


133 
131 
128 


e/ 93 
e/ 93 
e/ 92 


e / 100 
e/ 98 
e/ 98 



rsions at noon "buying rat 
ices, c/ October 1 to da 



e of exchange, b/ prices are of day previous to 
te. d/ February .and March futures, e/ March 



WHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 





All classes 


No. 


2 


No. 


i 


No. 2 Hard 


No 


2 


Western 


Week 


and grades 


Hard Winter 'Dk.N. Spring Anber Durum 


Red Winter 


White 


ended 


six marke t s 


Kansas 


City Minneapolis 


Minneapolis 


St. Louis 


Seattle a/ 




1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 : 


1935 


1936 


1935 1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents ; 


Cents 


Cent 3 i 


Dents 


Cents Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


High b/. 


112 


150 


123 ; 


143 • 


139 E 


175 


122: 183 


113 


143 


90 


115 


Low b/ . . 


93 


126 


109 : 


120 


125 i 


139 


108 ; 135 


102 


118 


... 82 


96 


Dec. 26. 


103 


145 


113 : 


141 


129 j 


163 


112- 178 


108 


141 


88 


114 




1936 


1937 


1936 ' 


1937 . 


1936 ! 


1937 


1936- 1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


Jan. 2 . . 


"107 


149 


118 ; 


143 


135 : 


176 


119 : 180 


111 


143 


90 


115 


9. . 


103 


150 


115 ; 


141 ' 


130 ; 


167 


122 : 180 


111 


143 


90 


114 


16. . 


105 


148 


112 


140 ■ 


132 


165 


120 ; 168 


107 


141 


88 





a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis Ho. 1 sacked, 
b/ October 1 to date. 



LITHUANIA: Winter grain acreage, 1932-1937 



Year of harvest 


Winter whea.t 


Winter rye 




Thousand acres 


Thousand acres 


1932 


409 


1,185 


1933 


393 


1,201 


1934 


403 


1,216 


1935 


414 


1,258 


1935 


349 


1,206 


3,937 


388 


1,269 


International Institute of Agriculture, Rome. 



54 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No, 4 



FEED GRAINS AND EYE: weekly average price per "bushel of corn, rye, oats, 

and barley at leading markets aj 





Corn 


Rye : Oats 


Barley 


Week 


Chicago 


BuenosAires 


Minneapolis > 


Chicago 


Minneapolis 


ended 


No. 5 

Yellow 


Future s 


Futures 


No . 


2 


Mo. 3 

White 


No. 


2 




1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1955 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




96 


lis 


90 


111 


40 


51 


80 


117 


58 


55 


113 


123 


Low b/ . . . . 


5S 


59 


59 
May 


59 
May 


38 
Feb. 


47 
Feb. 


42 


48 


27 


25 


41 


58 


Dec. 19. 


59 


107 


60 


103 


40 


50 


49 


113 


29 


52 


60 


131 


26 


58 


108 


60 


104 


39 


49 


50 


115 


29 


52 


61 


127 




1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1935 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


Jan. 2 


61 


108 


61 


105 


39 


50 


53 


117 


31 


~53 


64 


130 


9 




112 


61 


110 


3b 


49 


53 


116 


31 


55 


60 


129 


IS 




112 


50 


111 


38 


50 


53 


113 


30 


55 


71 


126 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest date shown. 



USjUD GRAINS; Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity • Exports ; Shipment 1937, • Exports as far 

and j ___ f or y ear j week ended, a/ j as reported „ 

country j 1934-35 ;1935-36 :jan. 2 jjan. 9 <Jan. 16; July 1 : 1935-36 :1936~37 

L I j j j i to ? b/ ! W , 

1,000 • 1,000; 1,000 j 1,000 j 1,000 : I 1,000 : 1,000 

BARLEY, EXPORTS: c/j bushels j bushels ^bus hel s ; bushels: bushel s; j b ushels j bushels 

United States. .. .: 4,050; 9,886: 0; 0« 0|jan. 16 j 7,009| 3,938 

Canada ; 14,453 j 6,882: j j jDec. 31 j 4,334 j 16,388 

Argentina ; 20,739: 9,468: 50: \ jjan, 2 j 2,900 j 4,157 

Danube & U.S. S.R.I 11,250:37,375: 389; lap. I 305 '.Tph. 16 i 36.891 LaUSZL 

Total g 50.492 : 63.611 | I ■ j I 51.134: 45.814. 

OATS, EXPORTS; cj \ ■ \ \ j j ; 

United States ,.J l,147j 1,429 j 0: 0: 0;Jan. 16 j 554 j 

Canada j 17,407;' 14,892; i : JDec. 31 j 9,877'; 6,679 

Argentina i 43,753= 9,790 I 77: 152: 296: Jan. 16 j 6,355: 7,931 

Danube &U.S.S.R. : 8.44 4: 2,647 : Oj pj Q:Jan. 16 I 1,39 0 : 800, 

To tal 7 0,751 j 2 8,958 j_ i = : i 18.175: 15 , 786 _ 

CORN, EXPORTS: d/ j ; : T~ ; ; Nov> i td i 

United States . ,.; 880 ; 885 ; 0; oj 2; Jan. 16 \ 47: 26 

Danube & U.S. S.R. \ 14,939 • 14,984 j 731 ; 553'> 638; Jan. 16 : 2,682: 6,199 

Argentina i 256,143 -307, 638 ■ 8,999= 6,138;. 8 4 918jJan. 16 j 67,128 ; 93,070 

South Africa ! 21,832 \ 8 ,910 j 750 \ 8_j_ 26! Jan. 16 ; 4,S21: 2,51 1. 

To t al ; 295,844 1352, 417 j \ ; j 74,673 : l01 ,j£l 

United States ; " t ! j ; ! : ! 

imports ■ 41,141 S 24,521 j j ;Nov. 30 \ 1,651: 6,265 



Compiled from official and trade sources, aj The weeks shown in these columns are 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary. _c/ Year beginning July 1. dj Year 
beginning November 1. 



January 25, 


1937 


Foreign Crops 


and Markets 


55 




CANADA: 


Production of specified crops, 1931-1936 


Year 




Wheat 


\ Eye 


Barley 






Thousand- bushels 


'• Thousand bushels 


Thousand bushels 


1931 


! 


321,325 


■ 5,322 


67,382 


1932. ... 




443,061 


i 8,470 


80 , 773 


1933 


■■'■::■}} 


281,892 


j 4,177 


63,359 


1934 




275,849 


i 4,706 


63,742 


1935. 




281,935 


■ ' 9,606 


83,975 


1936 




229,218 


j 4,281 


71,922 
i 




• 


VQsEts : : . 


• > -Flaxseed 


Potatoes 


1931 


: 


348,795 


2,465 


87,175. ' 


1932 




416,034 " : 


' ' ■ 2,719 


65,693 


1933 


i 


326,695 


632 


71,242 


1934 




341 , 190 ' ' 


910 ' *; 


80,158 


1935 




418,995 


1,472 


64,450 


1936 




288,764 


1,795 . 


65,057 



Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 



MGLAND AND WALES: Production of specified grains, 1931-1936 



Harvest year 


Wheat 


Barley 


Oats 




Thousand bushels 


Thousand bushels 


Thousand bushels 


1931 


55,915 


36„06.6 , . . 


85,751 


1932 


41,253 


35,798 


87.533 


1933 


58,725 


29,456 


85 , 820 


1934 


65,259 


33,927 


78 , 120 


1935 


60 , 592 ; 


30,613 


79,660 


1936 


51,445 


30,940 


75 , 600 



Coirroiled from official figures received from Agricultural Attache, C- C 
Taylor, London. 



56 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 4 



Index 



Page 

Late cables 47 



Apples, stocks, England, Jan. 1,1937. 51 



Barley; 

Area, Greece, 1936,1937 47 

Pro duct ion; 

Algeria, 1935,1936 47 

Canada, 1931-1936 47,55 

England and Wales, 1931-1936 ... 55 
Citron, production, Sicily, 1936 ... 51 
Corn, crop conditions, Argentina, 

Jan. 20, 1937 47,49 

Cotton; 

Imports, China, November 1936 .... 50 
Prices, China, Jan. 12, 1937 50 



Stocks, Shanghai, Dec, 31, 1936 .. 50 
Flaxseed: 

Harvesting conditions, 

Argentina, Jan. 20, 1937 47 

Production, Canada, 1931-1936 ,.47,55 
Grains (feed) ; 

Movement, principal countries, 



Jan. 16, 1937 54 

Prices, principal markets, 

Jan. 16, 1937 54 

Grapefruit, market conditions, 

England, December 1936 52 

Oats : 

Production : 

Canada, 1931-1936 47,55 

England and Wales, 



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Page 

Oranges, market conditions, 

England, December. 19 36 51 

Pork (cured), import quota, 

Great Britain, Mar, 31, 1937 47 

Potatoes, production, Canada, 

1931-1936 47,55 

Rye: 
Area: 

Greece, 1936,1937 47 | 

Lithuania (winter), 1932-1937 .. 53 

Prices, U.S., Jan. 16, 1937 54 

Production, Canada, 1931-1936 ..47,55 
Wheat : 
Area: 

Greece, 1936,1937. 47 

Lithuania (winter), 1932-1937 ., 53 

Exports, principal countries, 

Jan. 16, 1937 52 

Harvesting conditions: 

Argentina, December 1936 .....47,48 
Australia, Jan, 15, 1936 48 

Market conditions, China, 

Jan. 15, 1937 48 



Prices ; 

Shanghai, Jan. 15, 1937 48 

Specified markets, Jan, 16 , 1937 . . 53 

Production: 

Algeria f 1935,1936 47 

Canada, 1931-1936 47,55 

England and Wales, 1931-1936 ... 55 

Shipments, principal countries, 

Jan. 16, 1937 52 



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